but even if…

Sin

Are You Broken or Bent?

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about brokenness.

There was a pop song awhile back (by Pink & Nate Ruess) that contained the lyric “we’re not broken, just bent…” I found that idea so intriguing, but wasn’t sure what the Lord was saying to me through it.

Sometimes Christianese terms like “brokenness” start to feel trite after a while and it’s good to step back and reexamine. Typically, we tend to equate brokenness with being a mess of some sort – steeped in sin, beaten down by life, etc.

There are even some who have built churches around this theme… “Come, be broken with us.” Somehow this doesn’t sit quite right with me. Not that we can’t admit we’re messed up… I agree we need to recognize our need. But I feel that we get stuck there.

Perhaps our idea of brokenness is bent.

Before You Scratch That Itch…

This morning on the way to school, the kids asked me why God created poison ivy. Not so good at thinking on my feet, and since we were in the car and I couldn’t Google the answer, I fell back on the tried and true (or tired and presumably true) response to these sorts of questions. “Well, kids… it’s a fallen world,” I said, using the prescribed mix of sadness and acceptance in my voice.

The kids said little in response, probably unsatisfied by the stock answer, and I think we changed the subject. I wasn’t sure if I liked my answer, either. I mean, it just leaves you with sort of a slump. And, left incomplete, it doesn’t paint God as the hero He is, which is something I always want to help highlight for my kids.

So as I drove home and made my morning coffee, I asked God more about it. And that’s how I found out that God can speak through anything. Even poison ivy. (Spoiler alert: I don’t mean in the burning bush sense, so if you’re picturing a talking plant vine, it wasn’t quite like that.)

Le Pain & Whine Transformed (Part 1 of 2)

I remember thinking the French spelling for bread (my favorite guilty pleasure) was quite appropriate—le pain. Caught up in the woe-is-me culture of the nineties, I also indulged in whine, that is, wine (and its many bar-mates). I’d unknowingly created a warped version of the modern communion meal: Le pain dipped in whine. But Jesus wasn’t even on my radar— my eyes were on myself. Worse yet, I was looking at a caricature of myself that I’d created by imagining what everyone else thought of me.

Beauty Is Pain: Stay Plucky! (2 of 2)

If you feel as though you’re struggling with some sin that seems big and hairy and out of control (maybe like a giant, Burt-esque unibrow), I ask you to consider something. Think back to another area of past bondage that you are now free of and remember how difficult that seemed at the time. Remember how you were able to uproot that sin as you relied on God. Now trust Him to be faithful again. Ask Him. Let Him

You Are What You Eat

An old saying goes: The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree–implying the fruit (child) inherits the quality of the tree (parent). But which tree are we going to choose? Will we choose to be children of the world, carrying on in independence and bearing whatever natural consequences might follow from that decision? Or will we choose Jesus, living out of our spirit, according to the True Image we were created to resemble… the apples of His eye.